sábado, 27 de octubre de 2012

From Junk to a Security Station; How Mepis Gave New Life to a Discarded Computer

Last week, a project that had been brewing for quite a while became a reality. 

We wanted to set up a basic security camera for the office where I work but, as the University is short of budget, all we were given was a webcam.   With that contribution, the whole idea was pretty much a long-term goal (or a dream, to be more honest, given the circumstances).

However, I learned that they were discarding some "old equipment", which included computers.  I asked for one of those machines marked as "not-working" and could get a computer in which Windows XP ran so slowly that you could literally age before being able to type a letter with it.

With that poor wreck of a system, the webcam, and Megatotoro's help, we could make the security system dream a reality.

First, Megatotoro wiped out the HD and installed Mepis 11 to it.  Boy, what a difference a good OS makes!  The computer started performing decently.  To use an analogy, it went from snail speed to that of a marathon runner. 

Second, as the webcam was a Logitech model, Mepis recognized it instantly, without the pain of go driver-hunting.  Ah, and since Mepis has VLC, everything was ready for starting the security cam project.

The streaming capabilities of VLC made it easy to capture video from the webcam and store it as a local file.  I learned how to do this by accident a while ago and the process is rather simple:

1.  Under the menu FILE, I clicked on streaming.
2.  In the window that opens, I selected the tab CAPTURE DEVICE
3.  Now, this is the interesting part.  In the line SELECT DEVICE, I typed /dev/video0, and then clicked on STREAM.  A new dialog (Streaming output) opened and I clicked "next".
4.  Then I selected "show locally" and used the drop-down menu to select VIDEO THEORA+VORBIS (OGG)
5.  Finally, I clicked STREAM and voilà, the webcam started showing and recording video!

The humble computer is now there, working non-stop, like a true champion...And the rest of the workers became interested in Linux when they saw what it can do.

After all, who would have said that a discarded computer was going to resurrect as a modest, but effective security station? And for a total cost of $0? All thanks to Linux, free software, and people who know that the Windows paradigm is not the only reality that there is.


4 comentarios:

  1. Great history!
    As a Linux enthusiastic, as you, I'd like to share something...
    I run a very modest site, only to share some pictures with friends. And recently I joined a group of photographers on Facebook. What a surprise when Google analitcs shown 77% of visitors using Linux OS.
    https://sites.google.com/site/bywalterolegario/_/rsrc/1351388099846/home/passeio-fotografico/analitcs.jpeg

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  2. @Walter,

    Thanks for your visit and comment. The statistics that you shared are truly interesting! I've always suspected there are more Linux computers than what they say...

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  3. Your story offers strong evidence in favor that Linux desktop is dead: a dead computer now is working nonstop! :P

    I suspect that there are more computers like that one...and of course, they don't get counted in pro-Windows statistics...

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  4. Had a 3.0 GHz. PIV that had been toasted with malware at work...stuck a little more RAM into it and turned it into a web server for the new Wordpress website.

    We bought a couple of 32" digital TV's to hang in the window as electronic signs. I use Bodhi Linux on them and the display runs Libre Office Impress. As long as the slide transitions aren't complicated (low onboard video RAM) they work flawlessly. One is a PIII 1.0 GHz. box and the other is a PIV 1.8 GHz. box.

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